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Monday, 17 January 2011

Clapham Common

These fields as ponds known as Clapham Common in South London are bordered by large houses. A fashionable area from the 1790's when its inhabitants included evangelical reformers and wealthy business people.
The bandstand in the background was erected in 1890 and is the largest bandstand in London.

8 comments:

Irina said...

So beautiful city. CITY, with capitals.

jabblog said...

London can be proud of its green parks.

Tanya said...

what a beautiful setting

Northern Girl Knits said...

Ooo... I learned something new today thanks to you!! Makes me want to visit there.

Anna said...

Looks like you've lost all of your snow and cold. I can almost see Spring in this picture.

Peter said...

I guess that today there may be more wealthy business people than evangelical reformers? :-)

jo©o said...

Lovely view Mo.
You know they pronounced it 'Clahm', to rhyme with 'calm', when it went slightly upmarket in the nineties?
You have to laugh.

IleDuLevant said...

I live just off Clapham Common. When I walk across the Common, I try to imagine this flat expanse of grass as it was during World War II when it was given over to the growing of cabbages and other vegetables: apparently four V2 rockets landed here. The church where the Clapham Sect gathered still stands, complete with a Blue Plaque. Go further back in time and this was supposed to be a happy hunting-ground for highwaymen as it was then a densely wooded area on the main route to Portsmouth, as mentioned briefly in Matthew Kneale's excellent and enjoyable "English Passengers", fictional but steeped in historical research.

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