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Sunday, 17 April 2011

Monopoly - Marylebone Station

First of the stations. Landing here will cost £200.

Marylebone station is one of the prettiest stations in London. No underground leaves from here. Opened in 1899, one of the last of the rail lines to be built.

14 comments:

Adullamite said...

Always liked Marleybone. I think I am right in saying that a small garage in the road to the right of the station (as you look at it) has a small disc claiming Bentley made his first car there. At least my memory tells me this.

H said...

I don't think I've ever visited Marylebone station (except on the board). The love the way the sunlight streams through the roof windows. You have captured it beautifully.

zakton said...

This is a beautiful photo of a modern station. You've got the eye of a photographer. You take marvelous photos.

Central User said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Central User said...

"No underground leaves from here." ?

The Bakerloon Line has a stop at Marylebone Station.

Marylebone is my favourite station. I am biased though, commuting through it every working day.

Sharon said...

When you are back in town you will have to tell me the correct pronounciation of Marylebone. That's one I haven't been able to figure out.

Luis Gomez said...

Beautiful place! Great shot.

RedPat said...

Love this shot!

IleDuLevant said...

Beatles fans amongst may wish to know/probably already know that this station was used to shoot the railway station scenes in their first film, A Hard Day's Night.

Regarding the blue Bentley plaque: it can be found in Chagford Street, which is a very quiet, narrow, easy-to-miss ex-mews road, about four streets to the right of the station. I only know this because I would wander round the area when I did an intensive course in French at Alliance Française in Dorset Square, a building which was used to house Charles De Gaulle and his Free French Headquarters during the Second World War. Cricket aficionados will know that Dorset Square itself was the original location of Thomas Lord's cricket pitch/the MCC in 1787. With so much to occupy my lunch hours, I didn't need to bother with the fictional Sherlock Holmes at nearby Baker Street.

Karine said...

It is pretty, so bright and airy!

Jack said...

Mo, you composed this shot perfectly. I love the lights along the ceiling and the red posts.

Adullamite said...

Cheers for that lleDuLevant!

Adullamite said...

Indeed it is in Chagford Street, an old mews street. I love Google Maps!

nicki said...

How do you manage to get so many shots of central London with NO PEOPLE in them! I've noticed loads of peopleless photos!

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