Pages

Saturday, 11 February 2012

Staple Inn

Staple Inn is the last of the four inns of Chancery. The half timbered building has survived the great fire of London, bombing during the second world war and the general building decay during the 19th century that saw the other three inns demolished.

The earliest documented reference of this site is in 1292 as Staple Halle, most likely a covered market. "Staple" refers to the taxes introduced in 1275 as a levy paid by foreign buyers of wool.

Staple Inn became the home for a society of lawyers and students of law from 1415, and has remained in the service of the legal profession ever since.

15 comments:

Adullamite said...

All those years and I never knew the reason for this building. The Griffin outside represents the boundary of the City of London if I am not mistaken?

jabblog said...

Its survival is astonishing.

Kaori said...

Oh wow...that Inn is definitely a survivor!

Sharon said...

I'm so glad it has lasted all this time.

AnKa said...

I've come past this building a few times but didn't know about the origin of the name. Thanks for this bit of information.

Babooshka JH said...

Good to see these old building surviving. Good post as always.

Giselle said...

It's wonderful to see that this grand old building has survived.

Gemel said...

Amazing, if only those walls could speak..........

Jack said...

It is remarkable that this building has survived so long. It looks fragile enough that either a strong wind or fire would take it down.

Karine said...

Imagine what stories the walls of that building would have to tell if they could talk!!!

PerthDailyPhoto said...

Gosh 1292, that really is an amazing fact. Would love to be able to see this exact site way back then. What a history, am glad to see it still surviving Mo.

Jenny Woolf said...

I once read a fascinating 19th century description of it - it was a truly forgotten little corner of London then. I am sad that the interiors of the remaining buildings have been largely ripped out to meet modern needs. I suppose that keeping teh facades is better than nothing.
I have an idea this black and white timbering was put on in the 1920s or so when it was the fashion

Ken Mac said...

Where in London is this exactly. I can't place it.

Steffe said...

That is a long time.

patrick wilken said...

That's amazing. I had no idea these buildings were so old. I thought they were just mock tudor. love your blog. so many great posts.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...