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Wednesday, 11 April 2012

Drury Lane Gardens

By the late 19th century central burial grounds in London were full to overflowing and so it became necessary to move them out into the country. Sir Edwin Chadwick a sanitary reformer, wrote a report in 1843, that it would be in the public interest to keep the old burial grounds open as public green spaces. It took until 1877 for an act of parliament to be passed to see his recommendations eventuate. Drury Garden in Soho is one of the five public gardens that were created.

9 comments:

An Maliq said...

Ah, what a nice place! :-))

Babzy said...

clever man :)

Sharon said...

Another little bit of history that I didn't know! Interesting.

Lowell said...

A beautiful photo of a beautiful place. Kudos to you and to Sir Edwin!

Jenny Woolf said...

I was there yesterday. Isn't it a tiny little park - I suppose was better than wall to wall slums though when it was built. Chadwick was such an enlightened man.

Karine said...

What a lovely little place!

Julie said...

Ooo ooo ooo ... Mo would you do me a massive favour and post this onto my Taphophile Tragics meme, please. Reach it on my side-bar.

I adore the symmetry of your image. I am a sucker for balance. And for line. And for all things grave ...

Michael Hordern said...

Gahh! Will you *please* stop telling all these people about the nice quiet places I go for my lunch!

Have you mentioned Phoenix gardens in Seven Dials yet? Lovely green space, just off Shaftesbury Ave.

Argh, now I'm doing it!

/t. said...

a bit like
a garden in a prison yard,
but a nice break from the brick, i guess

× × ×

/t.

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