Pages

Sunday, 12 June 2016

Ted makes no bones about it


… which means to state a fact in a way that allows no doubt or objection (you know like teachers do!!) … funnily enough this saying originated right here in 15th century Engerland. Its original meaning was one of great dissatisfaction of having found bones in something you were eating which meant that you couldn’t swallow it without first dealing to the bone (potentially hidden) or encountering some substantial difficulty in continuing to breathe if you did swallow said object. History seems to have a lot to do with the fact that a dis-proportionally large number of Britons will not eat fish on the bone, usually sighting a nasty encounter with a bone that “nearly killed them” when they were “abroad” somewhere.

Whatever … moving on to today’s subject … Mackerel.  Once a member of the “fish you can eat without thinking you are endangering a species” list it has recently been downgraded to “eat occasionally” status.  Why? Well apparently mackerel are now to be found a long way from their traditional ocean occupation areas. Why? In pursuit of their traditional food sources like smaller fish (naturally as is the way of the food chain) crustaceans, and squid who are all moving to cooler waters nearer the north and south poles as global warming kicks in, and here they are being over fished outside of any quota systems that apply in their usual hangouts.

Mackerel are a rather extensive family of fish from large to small, with loads and loads of relatives. Their name means marked, spotted, or striped and they are indeed a fish that punches above its weight in the good looking stakes … unlike the ugly and very expensive Dover Sole or the oddly ginga and very pasty version of a fish, Rouget. They all like the tough guy in their family too, the King Mackerel, not such a giant but on the edge of being classified a game fish because it can swim at up to 10 kilometres an hour … I dare anyone to try that all day every day …

Mackerel is extremely versatile and is equally good whether eaten hot or cold, and a gazillion tons of it are canned every year. It’s delicious simply pan fried, is exceedingly popular smoked or peppered, and makes a very moreish pate. Hence it’s a great addition to any picnic basket … like the ones that are being dusted off all over the UK today for picnics in honour of the Queen’s official 90th birthday … 

3 comments:

Sharon Anck said...

What does the pope eat......very funny!

William Kendall said...

Admittedly sea food does not agree with me in any form!

Jack said...

Mackerel . . . funny, I eat a lot of fish, but can't say that I have eaten mackerel.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...