Sunday, 18 March 2012

New Life for Red Telephone Boxes

Why are the red telephone boxes still scattered throughout London in an age when everyone has a mobile?

For tourists of course!

20 comments:

Yuriy Akopov said...

Also, for prostitutes.

Angie said...

Hey, they could turn them into photo booths. Except nobody needs them anymore!

**Perler på snor** / Dorthe DK said...

Yes, of course - and we love them. :-)Dorthe

Steffe said...

I don't have a mobile, so I might need to use one of these one day.

Babzy said...

because ethey are nice;)

Luis Gomez said...

Beacuse they are wonderful!

Sharon said...

Oh good! I truly would miss them if they were gone.

Sandi @the WhistleStop Cafe said...

Because they make you smile
:-)

Dave Williams of Hyde, Cheshire said...

These telephone boxes were designed by the architect Giles Gilbert Scott .

AnKa said...

They are special and it's great to see them on the streets still. I hope they are preserved or put to a new use, like the one you posted about little while ago.

Irina said...

Let them stay! I have the one on my bookshelf, it always reminds me of London.

H said...

I love red telephone boxes. They should be compulsory street furniture in every British city, town and village!! (alongside red post boxes)

Gerald (Hyde DP) said...

the iconic box!

Karine said...

They're lovely, it would be a shame to get rid of them! Plus, a payphone is always important to have around in case you drop your cell phone into one of London's many puddles :oJ

Oakland Daily Photo said...

Red phone booths, double decker buses, Royal Mail boxes, all say England to us colonials. Cool traditions that tourism keeps alive. Cute photo, Mo.

RedPat said...

I have to admit to having little replicas of these on my shelves and pics to go with them!

Jack said...

Mo, your first photo is classic. It is a near-monochrome, but with the pop of red on the side. Beautiful composition!!!

IleDuLevant said...

There's a particularly important red telephone box in the courtyard of the Royal Academy – on the left, just after leaving the road behind. It is made of wood and is one of seven prototypes made by the above-mentioned Giles Gilbert Scott. As far as I know, it is the only example of a listed building within another listed building. Scott derived the iconic domed roof from the mausoleum of another important architect, Sir John Soane: http://www.discoverthereallondon.com/page183.html

The Londoneer said...

Do you know, it never struck me that was the reason! I can't remember the last time I used a phonebox - in the days when we did use them, they always stank of pee as I recollect...

MurciaDailyPhoto said...

Phone box must be keep, because if not, where is going to change its clothes Superman? :-)